Sandy Lim, National University of Singapore

Does Civility Matter? The Impact of Incivility on Work and Family
Sandy Lim

Description

Semester: 
Fall 2017
Lecture Time: 
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm
Lecture Location: 
R0220 Ross School of Business
Introduced By: 
Kathrina Robotham

Abstract

In the field of workplace mistreatment, incivility is a relatively new concept introduced just before year 2000. Although workplace incivility appears to be a mild form of antisocial behaviour at work, it has attracted increasing interest from researchers in the past decade. In the first half of the talk, I will discuss some of the earlier research that demonstrated its prevalence and wide-ranging effects on both work and employee health outcomes. I will then present some recent research that examines the effects of incivility across the work-family interface, in particular, how experiencing incivility at work could potentially affect spousal behaviors at home, and how experiencing incivility at home could potentially affect performance at work.

Additional Notes

Sandy Lim is an Associate Professor of Management and Organization in the National University of Singapore (NUS) Business School. She is currently a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Michigan. Her research has focused on interpersonal behaviors and mistreatment at work (in particular, workplace incivility), stress and occupational health, as well as work and family issues. She is currently investigating leadership and teamwork processes in a high stress environment: how medical teams come together to work effectively to treat trauma patients in the Emergency Room. Her work has been published in leading management and psychology journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. She has received both teaching and research awards, including Outstanding Educator Awards at NUS Business School, and Best Paper Awards from the U.S. Academy of Management and European Academy of Management. She received her PhD in Organizational Psychology from the University of Michigan.